Issue 9: The power of negativity, meet Woebot the chatbot therapist, bikes, more bikes and a stunning piece of innovation in insurance: trust

Issue 9: The power of negativity, meet Woebot the chatbot therapist, bikes, more bikes and a stunning piece of innovation in insurance: trust

It’s time for Issue 9 of Sparks & Kindling, and we thought it would be a great opportunity to highlight some positive outcomes of innovation as an antidote to some of the more exhausting aspects of real life. So for this issue only we thought we’d avoid any long reads and offer instead a mini smorgasbord of great ideas, different ways of thinking and some quick to get facts. 


BBC

BBC

Do worry and don't be happy - is negativity the real route to success?

Not all of us in innovation appear as euphoric as a celebrant in a happy, clappy cult, waving our jazz hands like a member of the chorus line in 42nd Street.   And now we have some justification in being a bit grumpy, negative or pessimistic at times. It turns out focussing on the reasons why you might fail, using a pre-mortem, letting negativity make you unhappy and embracing feelings of hopelessness might actually be really helpful tools for life, for work and to get to genuinely new thinking. These short clips tell you more

Listen here>

 


Fast Company/Co.Design

Fast Company/Co.Design

Can a chatbot be a good therapist?

Having said negativity can be a powerful agent of change, some negativity and particularly depression is just destructive. However, despite mental health increasingly being recognized as a national deficit and an area of need for the population, there just aren’t enough therapists to go around. The good news is that this chatbot (brilliantly named Woebot) is a surprisingly effective answer to at least filling some of the gap

Read the article about it here>

 


Emirates Team New Zealand

Emirates Team New Zealand

Bikes on boats

It’s easy to dismiss The America’s Cup as being a bunch of chunky lads messing around in boats, but with budgets in the billions it has also been a crucible of innovation and new technology. But the disrupter that saw New Zealand beat the holders from the USA 7 races to 1 last week was one of those innovations that is so bleedin’ obvious, it’s genius. Meet (and be immensely impressed) by the cyclors of Team New Zealand

Watch the video here>

 


Fast Company/Ford

Fast Company/Ford

Ford, no longer a car company

Over the last few years Ford have been placing some very big bets away from autos and towards the future of mobility, particularly in the urban setting. The latest is Ford GoBike, the relaunched bike share system in the Bay Area. Amongst many interesting aspects to the mobility experiments Ford is currently trialling, it surely is pleasing that a brand is focusing on developing new mobility answers in conjunction with cities rather than just using bikes as advertising real estate. This quick read details some more about their interesting plans around mobility

Read the article here>

 


Lemonade

Lemonade

Is trust the more profitable way to interact with customers?

As it turns out you can now put a price on being nice. In this blog piece see how standard economic theory is being turned on its head by the application of reciprocity - the instinctive yearning to respond in kind if someone does something good for you. And as if trusting your customers is not a big enough idea to get your head around, take a second deep breath as the example comes from insurance, not the first place you’d look for a new model based on trust

Read more here>

 


Ikea

Ikea

and finally….

Ikea have developed a frankly brilliant and bonkers way to encourage people to experiment with some new recipes. The instructions are visual infographics on baking parchment paper printed with food safe ink. So just collect the ingredients together, wrap it all up and put it in the oven. Brilliant, but possibly not pukka

Watch the video here>

 


 


View past issues or subscribe to receive Sparks & Kindling

Issue 8: Focusing on the first time, every time; a beautiful response to data bullshit; breaking the rearview mirror conundrum & some fabulous fails

Issue 8: Focusing on the first time, every time; a beautiful response to data bullshit; breaking the rearview mirror conundrum & some fabulous fails

Welcome to Issue 8 of Sparks & Kindling, where we take a moment to share some of the more thought-provoking, interesting or just plain entertaining articles and thinking we’ve come across in the world of innovation over the last few weeks.

 


GoPro

GoPro

A third way to think about innovating

An interesting listen from Harvard Business Review, that concentrates away from the usual discussion of whether you should be focusing on disruption or incremental innovation and starts to illustrate the benefits of innovating around the customer experience. Quite rightly (in our view) it doesn’t limit the idea of customer experience to just service, but more broadly talks about how adding products and services around your brand can enable more significant, and importantly low risk, growth.

Listen here>

 


Fast Company/Co.Design

Fast Company/Co.Design

With more data literacy comes less data bullshit

Lies, damn lies and statistics. We’re all a little bit jaded around data, statistics and facts at the moment, whether it’s business or politics.  Part of the problem is that sometimes we don’t understand the methodologies enough to know if what we’re being told makes sense or whether the data should be used in the way it’s being discussed. So, an immensely forward thinking student at Brown University has taken it upon himself to create Seeing Theory. It takes the five most common areas of statistics and using graphics and interactive tools, allows the user to understand the concept visually. Time for us all to get more informed and confident about stats.

Read the article about it here>

and the actual site - which is beautiful but desktop only>

 


Illustration by Alex Coriano

Illustration by Alex Coriano

How data can inspire design

Talking of data, here’s a great, quick list (hat-tip to IDEO) on how to use data to inspire design by going beyond the general rules of a market and finding the quirks and the start points for where your customers and the market might go next… all using data as a start point but then playing it forward to somewhere fresh and new.

Read the article here>



First time every time

Now here’s some interesting evidence from McKinsey about whether it’s worth spending so much effort buying loyalty (spoiler: probably not), or whether it’s now more effective to treat your customers as first time every time. With the rise of digital based purchasing, the chances of your customer dropping you from their consideration set has never been greater. So maybe it's time we changed how we think about long term customer relationships (quaintly referred to as loyalty) and think instead of how we engaged them the first time and figure out how to apply that to our interactions with them, every time. 

Read the article here>

 


Citymapper

Citymapper

The rearview mirror conundrum

There’s a lot of data out there and frankly much of it just tells you how the world is, not how it could be. Which is why we’re seeing a slew of brands break away from looking in the rearview mirror and start to build some bricks and mortar experiments to create data based on the “what could be”. We’re sure you’ve all heard about Amazon’s store in Seattle, but our favourite experiment of the moment is from Citymapper who not only provide the most brilliantly useful app for anyone trying to get around any major city, but who now want to work out how to actually improve the infrastructure. This week they’ve launched a bus and bus route and they’re running a series of experiments from which they’re going to derive new data sets. Clearly the bus driver relies on their rearview mirror, but it's good to see Citymapper at least focusing on what’s ahead.

Read the article here>

 


and finally….

 

Sofie Lindberg

Sofie Lindberg

Celebrating some fabulous failures

If you didn’t catch this earlier in the month, or you never got around to having a proper look, the Museum of Failure has launched in Helsingborg Sweden. Instead of focusing on what can be learned when a project goes well, they are fascinated by the lessons that can be learned when innovation fails (a worthy exploit). Some of the items are surely not a surprise. After all, who wouldn’t want to look like Hannibal Lecter when using the Rejuvenique facial toning system?

Read the article here>

 


 


View past issues or subscribe to receive Sparks & Kindling

Issue 7: Hope & joy from a fact-based expert, a useful manifesto for the brave new world of design with AI & the kids really are doing it for themselves

Issue 7: Hope & joy from a fact-based expert, a useful manifesto for the brave new world of design with AI & the kids really are doing it for themselves

It's been a little while, whilst the world had a small spin on it's axis, but here we go... welcome to Issue 7 of Sparks & Kindling!

As ever, we've tried to fill it with some of the more thought-provoking, interesting or just plain entertaining articles and thinking we’ve come across in the world of innovation over the last couple of months. So hopefully something both stimulating and maybe even useful too, let us know how we're doing.

 

BBC/Hans Rosling

BBC/Hans Rosling

 

The world really is becoming a better place (a fact-based piece of inspiration)

We all know it takes real skill to develop a presentation that is anything other than time your audience will never get back. Hans Rosling, IOHO, did more than anyone to take the most complex of information and present it in a way which not only created understanding but also inspired.  Sadly he died last week, so as our small tribute we repost one of the talks we come back to for encouragement when world issues feel a bit intractable and we lose perspective of the enormous positive changes that are happening. Do check out his other speeches and the work of Gapminder for a heartening view of how we can all continue to make the world a better place.

Watch the video>

 


Fast Company/Superflex

Fast Company/Superflex

 

10 principles for design in the age of AI

Like it or not artificial intelligence or at least the first tentative steps towards it are here to stay.  And although Alexa is not going to pass the Turing test any time soon we are hoping it will manage to get our takeaway order right. Designers used to know what the ‘rules’ were when the most an object could do was to be picked up and answered or ping when it was finished. So how should design change when the objects know more about us than we do? Yves Béhar shares his manifesto for this brave new world, and we love his combination of practicality as well as his dismissal of some of the more clichéd or anthropomorphic elements.

 

Read the full article>

 


TheLong+Short

TheLong+Short

 

Can going ‘undercover’ help keep kids safe?

We all worry that the corollary of letting our kids be independent is to put them in more danger. Of course Hans Rosling would no doubt have told us that our children have never been safer, but it sometimes doesn't feel like that. The city of Oslo thinks it might have the answer: recruit the kids themselves to help police their safety. By moving beyond the go-to solution of a public information campaign, and instead giving the children a voice to influence their own little bit of urban planning, getting to school has never been safer or greener. And there's never been a better reason for them to have their own smartphone either.

Read the full article>

 


and finally….

 

BBC/Terrific Scientific

BBC/Terrific Scientific

 

Roll up your sleeves with Terrific Scientific

We believe nothing's better than getting your sleeves rolled up and building some prototypes to see what might work and how you can make it work better. Just over a year ago we ran the kick-off for the BBC and The Wellcome Trust to develop a year of science focused programmes and activities, aimed at primary age kids, their families and friends, to get them more involved and excited in science and technology. Terrific Scientific is the result (and fun for curious minds of all ages) and this half-terms project is here - take a look and see if you can build a truly meteoric rocket to the stars.

Watch the video here>

 



View past issues or subscribe to receive Sparks & Kindling

Issue 6: Changing the world with 5 new business models, streetwalk inspiration, paranoia & ruin in innovation plus some rather nice jumpers

Issue 6: Changing the world with 5 new business models, streetwalk inspiration, paranoia & ruin in innovation plus some rather nice jumpers

Welcome to Issue 6 of Sparks & Kindling, a chance for us to share some of the more thought-provoking, interesting or just plain entertaining articles and thinking we’ve come across in the world of innovation over the last few weeks. Stimulating, and hopefully useful too, let us know your thoughts on the articles and videos below.

 

Don Tapscott/TED

Don Tapscott/TED

Five business models to change the world, no really!

This is the best, most succinct and possibly most fundamentally challenging account of why it’s going to be blockchain rather than AI that is really going to change the way we do business, work and create. With 5 transformational business models brought to life brilliantly in this TED talk, you don’t just get to finally feel confident in what blockchain and Etherium are, but also get some great start points for thinking about how you can actually use them to create a business model for the future

Watch the video here>

 


Image courtesy of Story

Image courtesy of Story

Time to get out, go see and get inspired before the weather really closes in

When was the last time you spent an hour getting out and about and giving yourself a completely new perspective from the creativity of others? We’re all guilty of not doing it enough, so last week the inhabitants of Smoke Towers put down our coffees with an extra shot, and took an hour to walk around Redchurch Street in Shoreditch, exploring Mast, T2Tea and the Nudie Jeans repair shop amongst others. We didn’t spend a penny (frankly we could easily have run up a monkey) but we did spot a huge amount of stimulus and new ideas around customer experience. As a call to arms here’s an article listing the 50 most beautiful concept stores worldwide, so why not use it as a start point for your own wanderings

Read the full article>

 


TheLong+Short/ Illustration Peter Judson

TheLong+Short/ Illustration Peter Judson

Failure, death and financial ruin

Next, the first of four great, short articles which we include for no other reason than they are a really good read. However, for those who need reassurance they will learn something, Rhodri Marsden (the keyboard guy in Scritti Polliti) reminds us, in his own uniquely acerbic style, of some of messier stuff associated with innovation and the traumas of getting new ideas off the ground

Read the full article>

 


The New York Times/Brian Chippendale

The New York Times/Brian Chippendale

Stealing candy from babies

Well not quite, but this short film from University of Pennsylvania Wharton School Professor Adam Grant, outlines three easy ways parents can foster creativity in their children. But we say why should it only be parents and kids who are given the inside scoop when leaders in any organization, who want to facilitate creativity in their people, can learn from these three invaluable lessons too?

Watch the video here>

 


and finally….

 

Kenzo/Carrie Brownstein

Kenzo/Carrie Brownstein

Culture nerds and some really, really nice jumpers

In case you missed the best perfume ad of all time, here it is in all its glory.  And if that wasn't enough it comes with a great article and a couple more outstanding videos, outlining the creative process of a couple of self-professed culture nerds. Check out "The Realest Real" video too, Kenzo's latest look book and a brilliant takedown of social media. Our advice, play loud and enjoy. 

Read the article and watch the videos here>



View past issues or subscribe to receive Sparks & Kindling

Issue 5: Smartening up athletics, ditching the silver bullet, "artificial" waiting and some rather lovely tailoring...

Issue 5: Smartening up athletics, ditching the silver bullet, "artificial" waiting and some rather lovely tailoring...

Welcome to Issue 5 of Sparks & Kindling. This time, given the doldrums of uncertainty which is set to become the new reality here in Britain, we thought we would lean a bit towards the lighter-side of what’s interesting in the world of innovation. Of course in the niche, mad and even bad ideas there can still be a kernel of stimulating thought, so enjoy the read and have a great summer.

 

Wired/Nike

Wired/Nike

Ditching the safety pin

Ready for the Rio Olympics (although sadly not approved in time for use), our first gold this week goes to an innovation focused on removing one of the major irritations of any kind of athletic event or organized run. Finally, not only have they replaced the need for endless safety pins to attach your running number, but the Aeroblade teeth present a new type of adherence technology with applications across a host of potential uses. We’ve all spent years marveling at how handy 3M’s technology around post-it notes has been, well this takes it on a whole lot further.

Read the full article>

 


Olio

Olio

Choosing to back seventeen runners rather than just the one

Solving intractable challenges might become easier if we were more willing to test a multitude of solutions rather than plowing on in search of one ‘silver bullet’ answer. Our view is that this type of approach should be used more often, especially when attempting to change ingrained habits. Sainsbury’s have pioneered an experiment in Swadlincote, Derbyshire, trialing a suite of ideas to see which of them work best together to help reduce food waste. Have a look and see which of the routes would have most effect on you.

Read the full article>

 


Fast Company

Fast Company

The waiting time illusion

“Artificial waiting” is becoming a regular occurrence in UX design, as coming up with an answer in the milliseconds it really takes can create a sense of disbelief or even anxiety in the user. This article is a great quick tour of how long people expect to wait to get an accurate result across a number of areas - amazingly we expect to wait less time to find a match on a dating site than to find a flight…. sadly revealing quite a lot about the human condition.

Read the full article>

 


Gizmodo

Gizmodo

3D printed food – available now!

If you’re around in the Shoreditch area over the next couple of days, you can enjoy some 3D printed food brought together as a nine-course dinner from Food Ink. To be perfectly honest, we’re not sure how much of the nine courses anyone will be able to get through without a blindfold. Still, it’s (probably) the future and if it is as bad as it looks, you can go get a bagel from just further up Brick Lane.

Read the full article>


And finally….

 

Bentley

Bentley

Intelligent Details: The Bespoke Driving Jacket

This is just a chance to briefly revel in the world of bespoke tailoring and fabulous cars. Choose which design you think best meets the brief (we’ve a very soft spot for the Gieves and Hawkes number).

Watch the video>

 



View past issues or subscribe to receive Sparks & Kindling

Issue 4: UX and bagels: exploring the science of choice; next generation blockchain and what’s really cool for teens in 2016…

Issue 4: UX and bagels: exploring the science of choice; next generation blockchain and what’s really cool for teens in 2016…

Welcome to Issue 4 of Sparks & Kindling, a periodic digest of the things that have been fueling our thinking at Where There’s Smoke over the last few weeks. Most are recent articles but we may drop in a few noteworthy classics. We hope you find it stimulating and hopefully useful too - let us know your thoughts.

 

Fast Company/Jeremy Kohm/EyeEM/Getty Images

Fast Company/Jeremy Kohm/EyeEM/Getty Images

The psychology of choice (and bagels)

Our first article is an entertaining as well as deeply profound analysis around the behavioural science of choice, focusing on the dilemma of where to get your bagel in the morning. Covering the key issues around how most people try to avoid choice and the accompanying anxiety it can produce, the article covers the key ways to help make choosing your product or service more inevitable.

Read the full article>

 


Fast Company/Hero Images/Getty Images

Fast Company/Hero Images/Getty Images

UX Reality Check: 14 Hard Truths About Users

This next article takes the choice problem on further, covering some newly collated collective wisdom on that critical but awkward subject of User Experience (UX). The idea is that we are now at the end of the phase where design has been led by what technology, time and money allows rather than understanding what, from a user point of view, you should do.  The next phase needs to take much more account of human psychology, and understand more about how people actually are rather than how we would like them to be.  So maybe the new way to measure success will be to ask how many of these hard truths our app or site answers rather than metrics such as stickability and dwell time.

Read the full article>

 


Techcrunch/Heathers

Techcrunch/Heathers

All the cool kids are doing Ethereum now

And now you are well warmed up mentally and just when you were feeling so money supermarket on all things blockchain, how would you feel if we told you that was all so last week? Introducing ethereum the cooler, more geeky but scarily more vague next evolution of blockchain.

Read the full article>

 


Neko Atsume screenshot

Neko Atsume screenshot

What’s cool for teens in 2016

Time to lighten up again after wrapping your mind around ethereum, and a chance to peak into the world of teens and what they really think is cool in the first half of 2016. Based on a US study, it looks pretty similar to what we see happening amongst the teens loitering around us here. Instagram, Netflix, Snapchat and Spotify rule, but how much do you know about finstas, musical.ly and the cat collecting craze that is Neko Atsume?

Read the full article>

 


And finally….

 

Wired

Wired

We got sprayed in the face by a 9D television

If you, like us, are fed up with the wait for affordable OLED TVs what about transforming your enjoyment of the soaps by letting your TV squirt eau de Queen Vic in your face? Or consider the appeal of Countryfile…with accompanying farmyard pong it might never be the same again…

Read the full article> 


 


View past issues or subscribe to receive Sparks & Kindling

Issue 3: A new bingo card for business meetings, are you jazz or classical in your mindset and a novel use for VR that is probably even less fun than it sounds...

Issue 3: A new bingo card for business meetings, are you jazz or classical in your mindset and a novel use for VR that is probably even less fun than it sounds...

Welcome to Issue 3 of Sparks & Kindling, a periodic digest of the things that have been fuelling our thinking at Where There’s Smoke over the last few weeks. This issue has a bit of a theme focusing on the mind and the medical. We hope you find it stimulating and hopefully useful too - let us know your thoughts.


20 cognitive biases that screw up your decisions

When you read this you may start to believe it’s a wonder any of us make any decent decisions at all. But as you’ll quickly realise, that’s its own cognitive bias coming into play! More usefully this is great groundwork before you take new ideas to your board/funders/investors - consider which biases the various individuals tend towards and plan how you’ll be able to challenge or assuage them. And in the meantime, well it could be the new bingo card for business meetings.

Read the full article>


99u.com

99u.com

Don't just finish your product, evolve it

A couple of key biases in the last article sadly lead many great innovations sitting on the shelf of never launched, as the powers that be ask for more information or confirmation of perfection of the idea on the starting blocks. This article argues you need more of a jazz mindset and that to harness innovation you need to abandon all efforts to imagine a perfect end product, rather what you really need is a good one that evolves. There are a few other good takeaways using the jazz versus classical analogy in this thoughtful and long-form article.

Read the full article>


Illustration by Sally Thurer

Illustration by Sally Thurer

We're more honest with our phones than with our doctors

At the moment we’re in the early days of mobile health apps, focussing on their capability to make informed medical conversations happen at a time to suit the user. Interestingly, this article focuses on how our phones and mobile devices can enable us to have a much better, more intimate and more accurate understanding of our bodies, leading to better and earlier diagnoses. Partnering with the right apps can also be a great source of valuable and surprising insights that you might not otherwise uncover as the Grindr example in the article brings to life.

Read the full article>


And finally...

Excedrin Migraine Experience

Excedrin Migraine Experience

Have a migraine via virtual reality

There’s a lot of talk about virtual reality and the new VR rollercoaster ride sounds like fun, but for the most part, it all feels a little bit once and done. Now this doesn’t sound fun at all, but it does sound useful and a way to walk in someone else’s shoes so you can design and solve for them better. From next month, if you have a Google Cardboard, you can experience a migraine in VR yourself – now that’s something to look forward to, isn't it...

View the video>


View past issues or subscribe to receive Sparks & Kindling

Issue 2: Leadership behaviour good & dishonest, a latter-day da Vinci & one risk of flying cracked by a 17 year old...

Issue 2: Leadership behaviour good & dishonest, a latter-day da Vinci & one risk of flying cracked by a 17 year old...

Welcome to Issue 2 of Sparks & Kindling, a periodic digest of the things that have been fuelling our thinking at Where There’s Smoke over the last few weeks. Most are recent articles but we may drop in a few noteworthy classics. We hope you find it stimulating and hopefully useful too - let us know your thoughts.

18 behaviours of emotionally intelligent people

A couple of contrasting articles to kick off with this time.  The first outlines characteristics of emotionally intelligent people, behaviours it strikes us that should not only be more valued in all our leaders but also are extraordinarily helpful when it comes to problem solving and developing new ideas.  

Read the full article>


Gizmodo

Gizmodo

Why rich and successful people are often dishonest

The second article looks at more of the “dark side” of success, suggesting that competition may not be the force for good it is often portrayed to be as it can engender unethical behaviour in ‘winners’ and actually impede progress. A useful counterpoint to the first article.

Read the full article>


The Guardian

The Guardian

Inside Grayson Perry’s sketchbook

At wts towers we do love Grayson Perry (even if our shelves are not heaving with his wonderful pots, more’s the pity). Along with his ability to articulate what it means to be an artist and his council on staying on the effing bus if you want to achieve originality and success, his notebooks now provide a glimpse into a creative process which even for him remains incremental. It’s always worth remembering that we should give ourselves the creative room to make mistakes before committing to the labour intensive version.

Read the full article>


New money & mental health policy institute launched

On a slightly serious note this is shout out for a project which we believe could be life changing for a great number of people in the UK whose mental health puts them in the way of serious financial harm. No doubt many of the ideas will also be beneficial for the wider population too.

Read the full article>


And finally...

 

ted.com

ted.com

How germs travel on planes…and how we can stop them

Where to start….. a deceptively simple and cheap solution to a real world problem? Another reason to feel anxious on those silver cigar tubes with wings we like to call planes? Watch in under 5 minutes a 17 year old inventor once again showing us that the kids have got our backs.  

View the video>



View past issues or subscribe to receive Sparks & Kindling

Issue 1: The death of banks?, organising for innovation and the Babel Fish at last

Issue 1: The death of banks?, organising for innovation and the Babel Fish at last

Welcome to Sparks & Kindling, a periodic digest of the things that have been fuelling our thinking at Where There’s Smoke over the last few weeks. Most are recent articles but we may drop in a few noteworthy classics. We hope you find it stimulating and hopefully useful too - let us know your thoughts.

Chris Skinner's Blog

Chris Skinner's Blog

The top ten trends in banking innovation

It seems that people have been talking up about how banking is going to change for the last 20 years. But maybe at long last technology is ready to bring banks, which actually work for people, into the real world. These 10 innovations give some encouragement that real changes in how we handle our money are just round the corner. Our current favourite is ways to bring transactions to life, for instance the ‘shattered’ screen when you’ve just broken a personal daily limit. But the real proof that banking innovation is starting to take hold will be when consumers become more willing to change bank than get a divorce! 

Read the full article >


The Observer

The Observer

Francis Crick’s £700m altar to biomedical science

We love the new Francis Crick Institute not only because of it’s size, the science that will be pursued or the stunning architecture. But it’s what’s on the inside that’s really interesting to us. Inside Europe’s newest and largest biomedical research facility is far more radical, specifically in how it is structuring itself for innovation. Organised to accelerate the development of promising research into real innovations and therapies, the usual Departments have been removed and interest groups, shared space, places to overhear and add thinking in, active collaborations are all in. We’re betting they’re using slack.com as well… 

Read the full article >


Fastcodesign

Fastcodesign

The 5 Coolest Pieces Of Wearable Tech At New York Fashion Week

Is wearable technology at last moving out of the hands of techie designers and into the hands of fashion designers? Data may be king but with most wearables being consigned to the drawer after 6 months, it makes longer term data collection a real challenge. Maybe their adoption by one of the most short-termist of industries will finally signal their diffusion into everyday wear. Read more to see some interesting examples of wearable tech in fashion.

Read the full article >


The Boston Globe

The Boston Globe

Disney unveils surge pricing plans for parks

From Cirque De Soleil to Disneyland, dynamic or surge pricing is increasingly being imposed on us. Supposedly to spread demand, clearly it’s a way to make more money when demand is high but there must be a risk associated with customer experience and ultimately how customers feel about these brands.

Read the full article >


P.S. if you subscribe to WSJ, then take a look at this…

The language barrier is about to fall

OK this one is personal. We have been waiting for the babel fish since it popped out of the brilliant mind of Douglas Adams. So, if you never felt fluent enough to actually use that extra language you learnt at school or your excuse is “you’re a scientist not a linguist” you can soon stop feeling bad about it.

Read the full article >


View past issues or subscribe to receive Sparks & Kindling